April 8, 1814

Dear Sgt. Rountree,

Please have Captain Renselaer at Hyde park promptly at one o’clock in the afternoon on April the fifteenth.  I will be wearing a yellow pelisse.  You can respond to me at the Clarendon Hotel as I will be travelling the next few days to make it to the capitol by April 13.

Regards,

A.C. Abbingdon

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April 10, 1814

14 Peter St., London

 

Dear Miss Abbingdon,

I don’t think seeing Capt. Renselaer is a good idea.  He is still suffering from injuries which he received at Salamanca.  He is adamant that he not see you.

Sgt. Rountree

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April 15, 1814

The Clarendon, London

Sgt. Rountree,

This is the first I have heard of any injuries.  Thank you for informing me.  To what extent are they?

A.C. Abbingdon

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April 16, 1814

Miss Abbingdon,

Capt. Renselaer suffered a slash from his face to his left arm which nearly severed the limb before Richard Ware jumped in front of him and took the next blow, saving the captain’s life.  His arm is virtually useless and he has scarring which he feels is disfiguring.  He has wounds to his soul as well which are much more serious.

Regards,

Sgt. Rountree

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April 17, 1814

The Clarendon

Sergeant,

I thank you for your candor.  I am not afraid of the captain’s wounds, internal or external. For now however I understand his wishes to remain apart.  I expect time will heal some of his wounds.  Can you tell me how he is using the money he is withdrawing from his account?

Sincerely,

A.C. Abbingdon

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April 18, 1814

Miss Abbingdon,

He is gambling.  I have tried to restrain him to no avail.  He is determined to go to perdition through wild living I think.

Sgt. Rountree

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April 19, 1814

Sergeant,

What other income does he have?

A.C.

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April 19, 1814

None

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April 20, 1814

Sergeant,

Please let me know what household expenses the captain has and I will forward you the funds to keep him housed and any servants paid.  Let him run out of money to gamble with however.  Please let me know of his state of affairs whenever you can.

Sincerely,

A.C.

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April 21, 1814

Miss Abbingdon,

He will not take charity.

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April 21, 1814

It is not charity.  It is an investment in his future.  I expect you to help me realize a return on my investment.

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April 21, 1814

How?  He will not listen to reason.

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April 22, 1814

Just keep him alive for the next two years.  I will do the rest.

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April 23, 1814

I don’t understand.  How am I to keep him from drinking and being reckless?

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April 23, 1814

When he has no money, he will have to rusticate at his family’s estate.  There he can begin to heal.  London is likely the worst place for him.

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April 24, 1814

What is your plan?

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April 25, 1814

It is not fully formed yet.  I will let you know when it is.

I must return to Lincolnshire, please address any further concerns to Greystone.  And let me know his progress.  Please.

Regards,

A.C. Abbingdon

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September 14, 1814

Miss Abbingdon,

We are to remove to the Captain’s family home in Witcombe.  I am enclosing the address.  He did run out of money and yet has no idea my wages and those of the other servants are being paid by you.  God help us if he ever does find out.  His pride would never take the blow.  I pray that your estimation of his recovery by being at his family home is correct.  He is in a bad way.

I tried to pack the letters you sent him through the years and he would not allow it.  He keeps them bound in a packet which is on his person at all times.  I imagine a number of them were lost during the war, so there are only about six or seven still intact.  Those get plenty of wear as he continues to read and reread them.  I have also found a braided lock of hair time and again in his hand after he has passed out from drink.  I don’t know if this is significant to you or not.

I will keep you appraised of any further developments.

Sgt. Rountree

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